Tuesday, February 25

Saints for Children

Be Saints! is available from Ignatius Press

Pope Benedict tells children that if we grow in our friendship with God then we will find true happiness and become saints. In this beautifully illustrated book, popular author Amy Welborn introduces Pope Benedict's simple yet profound message to children, given during talks to children his recent visit to England.

In this very colorful book by acclaimed artist Ann Englehart, the Pope's words come to life as he interacts with the children, showing all children how only God can satisfy the deepest needs of our hearts.

Interspersed are prayers and quotes from various saints including Saint Francis, Saint Ignatius, Mother Teresa, St. Paul, St. Peter and more. They all emphasize that the most important thing we can become in this life is a Saint, a true friend of Jesus.

Bible Study for Lent

It's never too early to be thinking about Lent! 

(Ash Wednesday is March 5) 

Amy Welborn


Matthew 26-28: Jesus' life-giving death offers a close look at the passion, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ in Matthew's Gospel. 

It is a part of Loyola Press' Six Weeks With the Bible series, which provides individuals or groups plans for concise but thorough 90-minute sessions to learn about and discuss the pertinent Scriptural passages.  General guides for how to effectively lead an adult education session are also included.  The series is available in paperback and also in Kindle versio

Friday, February 21

Amy Welborn Interview

An interview in the "Pentecost 2012" edition of Dappled Things about Wish You Were Here.


DS: Something I personally enjoyed about the book is that it’s not presented as a neat, orderly journey through the stages of grieving—it reads as a much more honest account of how you and your children dealt with such a tremendous loss. When you look back upon those first few months, does it seem like there was a “process” you went through emotionally?AW: Well, it’s not neat, is it? Nothing about it is neat or orderly, and that’s one of the reasons I like one particular word in the subtitle: “through.” It’s not to hope from loss. It’s through them —and you thread back and forth through them all the time. In those first months, I don’t know if I could call what happened a “process.” It’s the result of life moving on and some discipline in your thoughts, emotions, and spiritual life. Time passes, and that does its work. But it doesn’t do all the work, and being able to get up every day and try to work towards peace isn’t automatic. I could only do it—process it—by placing every moment in a spiritual context. In the context of Passion and Resurrection, and the suffering, loss and limitations that are part of the human condition on earth and were taken up in Christ.

Amy Welborn Interview

An interview at the "Reading Catholic" website:

Q.  As I wrote in my review, “If you’ve been through the loss of someone dear, Wish You Were Here will just make sense….Your’re fine, and then you’re not.  You’re overwhelmed with sadness, and then you have hope.  You cling to your faith, but you have doubts and questions and what-ifs.”  Did you realize how much you were writing for so many other people when you wrote about your own experience of grief?

A.  I didn't realize, but I hoped I was. That was the only reason to write it: to help other people.  I don't mean that to be pretentious. It's just true. I was helped by other people's writing about their own experiences - everyone from the well-known like C.S. Lewis (A Grief Observed) and Kathleen Norris (Acedie) to simply bloggers sharing their own experiences of grief - that I hoped I could contribute a helpful voice to that never-ending conversation

Thursday, February 20

RCIA Resources

The Words We Pray is a collection of short essays that reflect on the meaning of traditional Catholic prayers, tying together history, theology, spirituality, and personal devotion.

Read more about it here.
The monks raised their voices in hope at the end of each phrase, and then paused a great pause in between, letting the hope rise and then settle back into their hearts. My own heart rushed, unbidden by me, uncontrolled, right into those pauses and joined the prayer. A prayer written by a eleventh-century bedridden brother, chanted by monks in the middle of Georgia, and joined by me and the silent folk scattered in the pews around me, each with his or her own reasons to beg the Virgin for her prayers.
And we weren’t the only ones joined in that prayer. With us was a great throng of other Christians who had prayed it over the centuries, and who are praying it at this very moment.
My days as a prayer snob were over.

It would be a great resource for inquirers into the Catholic faith.  

Tuesday, February 18

Amy Welborn Interview


CF: Do you usually stick to a planned itinerary exclusively or prefer to discover more spontaneously? 

AW: I balance it out. It’s unwise to be too hard-nosed in either direction. If I didn’t plan at all, didn’t research, I’d miss something interesting and would regret that. But being too anal about a schedule will have exactly the same impact – and will make everyone miserable. I generally like to schedule – wow, I even hate the word! – one major destination a day, and then leave the rest of the time unstructured and free for wandering. The most memorable sites tend to be the unexpected, don’t you think? It’s very much like life. A plan is good, but who doesn’t look back at their life and acknowledge that the most wonderful things about your life were those that were surprises that popped up outside of the plan?

Amy Welborn Interview

Here's a link to an interview with Catholic Spotlight about Prove It: You. 

In this interview, Amy Welborn talks her new book for teens, Prove it! You.  She discusses why this is the last book in the Prove It! Series and why she chose to write this book now. She talks about how she approaches teen sexuality, social justice, the pro-life issues, friendship, peer presure, and much more

Free Book for Lent

Monday, February 10

Books for Catholic Women

amy welborn
The Catholic Woman's Book of Days would be a wonderful birthday gift for any woman - mom, sister, friend. It's a 365-day devotional written for Catholic women - all Catholic women. It is loosely tied to the liturgical year, is a very handy size, and features special devotions for several saints. It is not structured to be tied to any particular year. So it’s sort of perennial.

You can find more information and ordering information here. 

Lent Bible Study

It's never too early to be thinking about Lent! 

(Ash Wednesday is March 5) 

Amy Welborn


Matthew 26-28: Jesus' life-giving death offers a close look at the passion, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ in Matthew's Gospel. 

It is a part of Loyola Press' Six Weeks With the Bible series, which provides individuals or groups plans for concise but thorough 90-minute sessions to learn about and discuss the pertinent Scriptural passages.  General guides for how to effectively lead an adult education session are also included.  The series is available in paperback and also in Kindle versio

Saturday, February 1

2014 Daily Devotional

Still not too late!  Only one month in! As a new year begins, many look for a devotional to jumpstart daily prayer.  As Catholics, our starting point is the prayer of the Church - the Liturgy of the Hours and the Mass.

Universalis.com is the best source for both, and of course Magnificat is a wonderful adaptation  of the Church's prayer, solid, rich and beautiful. 

But if you want something informal to add to the mix for 2014 consider The Catholic Woman's Book of Days.  It's a 365-day devotional, tied to the liturgical year as closely as possible for a volume that's not produced anew every year.

You can check it out here! 



"amy welborn"

RCIA Resources

The Words We Pray is a collection of short essays that reflect on the meaning of traditional Catholic prayers, tying together history, theology, spirituality, and personal devotion.

Read more about it here.
The monks raised their voices in hope at the end of each phrase, and then paused a great pause in between, letting the hope rise and then settle back into their hearts. My own heart rushed, unbidden by me, uncontrolled, right into those pauses and joined the prayer. A prayer written by a eleventh-century bedridden brother, chanted by monks in the middle of Georgia, and joined by me and the silent folk scattered in the pews around me, each with his or her own reasons to beg the Virgin for her prayers.
And we weren’t the only ones joined in that prayer. With us was a great throng of other Christians who had prayed it over the centuries, and who are praying it at this very moment.
My days as a prayer snob were over.

It would be a great resource for inquirers into the Catholic faith.  

Charlotte Was Both

Charlotte Was Both is the name of Amy Welborn's current blog.  It is located here. 

From the blog's "about" page:


Thanks for visiting. I've been blogging since 2001.  This is my third blog and third blog platform. (Fourth if you count the brief foray to Beliefnet for a few months in 2009. Readers just found it an unsatisfying experience, and it didn't feel like "home.") This blog is not updated daily, and it's not newsy. It's just sort of here.  We come, we go.  I do a lot of writing in various forms, and this is just one more, although it seems to be mostly photographs these days. Email is all read, and thank you for writing. Here's my other blog: Booked: A Travel Blog  Here's my webpage I'm all linky and newsy on Twitter - for the moment. I go back and forth on Twitter, but I'm there for the now: amywelborn2 I'm playing with Pinterest here.  Just got started (8/2011). Don't know how long it will last.Here's my Amazon page - with links to all my books.
amy welborn
It is not often that someone comes along who is both a true friend and a good writer. Charlotte was both.
(E. B. White, the conclusion of Charlotte's Web.)

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